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Black Lives Matter - KCCD
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Black Lives Matter
ALM
  • codiepie
  • 01, June

Black Lives Matter

“The mass incarceration of Black and Brown people and their treatment by the hands of the justice system may be seen as the new caste system of the United States.”
Black Lives Matter

Hyepin Im

CEO/President of KCCD

In this inaugural edition of Prophetic Voices, we tackle the most pressing racial issue in the United States today, the treatment of African Americans in the justice system. The mass incarceration of Black and Brown people and their treatment by the hands of the justice system may be seen as the new caste system of the United States.

Black Lives Matter

Russell Jeung

Author, Professor, Asian American Studies San Francisco State University

As seen in the past year, the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson. Eric Garner in New York, Walter Scott in North Charleston, South Carolina, and Freddie Gray in Baltimore–each at the hands of police officers– has led to serious questioning of whether Black lives matter in the eyes of our society.

Black Lives Matter
“All people have the right to breathe.”
Black Lives Matter

Grace Ji-Sun Kim

Author, Associate Professor of Theology at Earlham School of Religion, Huffington

“The dying words of Eric Garner symbolize our situation. ‘I can’t breathe’ speaks from the grave and describes the circumstances faced by many who are being choked by a system that treats different races and classes of people unequally. There is still a long road ahead to achieve equality for all those who are not white. The vision of the United States is that all people have a right to breathe free whether they are born poor or rich; black, white, or brown; male or female. Yet too many of our citizens struggle to breathe free when their breath is taken away with the disparities. The police are among the gatekeepers who control the flow of oxygen. We cannot allow an unequal system to suck our breath away. Breath is life.”

“As Asian Americans, we should stand in solidarity with African Americans because we, too, can understand government repression.”

“The dying words of Eric Garner symbolize our situation. ‘I can’t breathe’ speaks from the grave and describes the circumstances faced by many who are being choked by a system that treats different races and classes of people unequally. There is still a long road ahead to achieve equality for all those who are not white. The vision of the United States is that all people have a right to breathe free whether they are born poor or rich; black, white, or brown; male or female. Yet too many of our citizens struggle to breathe free when their breath is taken away with the disparities. The police are among the gatekeepers who control the flow of oxygen. We cannot allow an unequal system to suck our breath away. Breath is life.”

Black Lives Matter
Black Lives Matter
Black Lives Matter
Black Lives Matter
Black Lives Matter
“We don’t see ourselves as having the same experiences as African Americans, but we have much more in common than we think.”
Black Lives Matter

Daniel Chou

Editor-in-Chief, INHERITANCE Magazine

“The problem is that we APIs don’t know our history, we don’t know the atrocities which we’ve faced. We focus on the ‘promise land’ of America and forget our families’ hardships and our own stories of oppression and slavery. We don’t see ourselves as having the same experiences as African Americans, but we have much more in common than we think. A lot of this is about the relevancy of the church. Will we continue to stay in our churches, leave the world behind, and not do anything about [social problems]? We are in a new era where where we have to rise up, speak, and be engaged beyond sharing Facebook posts. We have to put ourselves in the middle of this issue.”

Black Lives Matter
Black Lives Matter
“We cannot hide from the racial injustices of the United States, a large percentage of stores looted in Ferguson were owned by South Asians.”
Black Lives Matter

Sam George

Director of Parivar International, a non-profit serving Asian Indian families

“A large percentage of stores looted in Ferguson were owned by South Asians. We cannot hide from the racial injustices of the United States. Mahatma Gandhi, the father of the nation (India), was a major influence on Martin Luther King in the 1950s calling the nonviolent resistance as ‘the morally and practically sound method open to oppressed people in their struggle for freedom.’ Also, we must not forget that 1965 immigration reforms which brought most of Asian Indians to the United States, are closely linked to the Civil Rights movement. Above all, as Christians, we have to show our solidarity with our black brothers and sisters, and seek justice for all oppressed people for in that we bring God’s reign into the world.”

“The deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner and the grand jury decisions following their deaths serve as a wake up call to the Asian American Church.”
Black Lives Matter

Edward Young Lee

Former White House Associate Director and formerly with the Jubilee Project

“The deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner and the grand jury decisions following their deaths serve as a wake up call to the Asian American Church. At the end of the day, the Church holds the answer to racism. We must not forget the journey of the Apostles who began the first churches on the principle that “God has just shown me that no race is better than any other” (Acts 10:28). And we must not forget that the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s was led by a reverend who proclaimed the Biblical truth of loving others as you love yourself. The church exists to be a reflection of His light onto this world, and there’s no better time than now to live that out. It’s in this state that the Asian American Church can and must contribute to the national dialogue around race relations, rather than remain silent. It’s time for us to recognize Michael Brown and Eric Garner not as their child and their brother, but as our child and our brother. Black lives matter, because they matter to God.”

“I have struggled as to how I can come alongside my African American brothers and sisters in a way that is biblical and affirming but not condescending, to be a true friend but not a rescuer.”
Black Lives Matter

Rev. Peter Chin

Author of Third Culture, Christianity Today Blog

“As a non-black person, the death of Eric Garner was shocking and deeply troubling to me. I could barely bring myself to watch the video of his harrowing arrest, knowing that his shouts of ‘I can’t breathe!’ would be his last. Yet I must confess part of the reason I am so outraged by his death is that I have lived in ignorance of black oppression for so long. As such, I have struggled as to how I can come alongside my African American brothers and sisters in a way that is biblical and affirming but not condescending, to be a true friend but not a rescuer. To others who feel the same, I would suggest that the incarnation of Jesus provides a wonderful model of how nonblack people can stand as allies to our African American family in Christ.”

“But as I reflected, I felt a complete sorrow over the breakdown of our society.”
Black Lives Matter

Samuel Han

Youth Pastor from Grace Ministries International and District Director for Assemblymember Don Wagner

“But as I reflected, I felt a complete sorrow over the breakdown of our society. To the side that feels that they’re in power, they need to never forget the weak and defend the oppressed. To those who feel a grievance against the government and police, the Bible says to forgive and to pray for our leaders. The church can be involved, working together with the police, to support all sides of the community. There needs to be real spiritual renewal for us to pray for the community and to counsel each side of the community towards reconciliation. I think obviously, both sides can agree that violent actions aren’t emblematic of a just society which we would want.”

“Government and communities leaders, like those in the faith community, must be committed to building stronger relationships between law enforcement and all the communities they are meant to protect and serve. We can, and must, do better.”
Black Lives Matter

Congressman Mike Honda (CA)

Youth Pastor from Grace Ministries International and District Director for Assemblymember Don Wagner

“These two rulings [on the Michael Brown and Eric Garner cases] further entrenched the mistrust between minority communities and law enforcement in many cities. However, I hope everyone will not allow these disappointments to cause us to lose our faith in our entire justice system. Government and communities leaders, like those in the faith community, must be committed to building stronger relationships between law enforcement and all the communities they are meant to protect and serve. We can, and must, do better.”

Jason Chu’s Spoken Piece

Jason Chu through his spoken word piece, “They Won’t Shoot Me” deconstructs racial privilege to fight for justice for all. At the same time, as noted, Asian Americans as minorities also face disproportionate discrimination at the hands of authorities.

The story of Lovely Varughese, whose 19 year old son Previn died suspiciously in 2014 in which the local police and state troopers acted questionably is one of many cases in the API community who have also faced racial challenges in the criminal justice system. For more information and to hear her compelling journey which is still yet to be finished, please visit http://www.justiceforpravin.org/

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